Author Emma Palova’s book signing of The Lost Town @Fallasburg one-room schoolhouse

Last minute notice: Lowell author and Lowell Ledger reporter Emma Palova will be at the Fallasburg one-room schoolhouse signing her new book The Lost Town this Sunday, Sept. 18 from 1 to 4 pm during the @Fallasburg Arts Festival. Stop by to get a signed copy of one of her books and meet the author.

The Lost Town

In the third book of the Shifting Sands series- “The Lost Town”- author Emma Palova of Lowell creates the protagonist, Miss Ida. The historical fiction novel is set in the ghost town of  Singapore on the shores of Lake Michigan at the foot of the sand dunes adorned with white pines. Beautiful Ida is torn between her hometown of Chicago and her new home on the other side of the lake, and between two men.

Developed by New York investors, the once-thriving settlement of Singapore nurtured the dreams of adventurers like Oshea Wilder and pioneer settlers alike. Singapore would rival Chicago and Milwaukee. It almost did with its sawmills, hotels, boarding houses, stores, and a “wildcat” bank.

Entrepreneurial Ida struggles to adjust to the rough environment but finds more than support in her boss who invited her to Singapore to be the “Mistress” of the Big House. A “wildcat” bank was established in Singapore in 1837.

Who will win Ida’s heart?

The whimsical cover was designed by graphic artist Jeanne Boss of Rockford. The book was edited by Carol Briggs of Lowell.

More book signings

Emma’s book signings in October, November, and December

Oct. 1 & 2- Blue Coast Artists @Earth Stories Jewelry, south of Saugatuck/Douglas at 2742 68th St.

Nov. 5 – Holiday Craft Show, Duncan Lake Middle School, 10-3 p.m.

9757 Duncan Lake Ave SE, Caledonia, MI 49316

Nov. 18-20 Christmas through Lowell, Lowell Area Historical Museum, 325 W. Main St., Lowell, MI

Listen in to the interview on @The Morning Show with Shelley Irwin on
95.3 / 88.5 FM Grand Rapids and 95.3 FM Muskegon

Click on the link below to listen to the interview.

https://www.wgvunews.org/the-wgvu-morning-show/2022-09-14/the-lost-town

#thelosttown #fallasburgvillage #shiftingsandsseries

The Lost Town

The cover was designed by graphic artist Jeanne Boss of Rockford, and the book was edited by Carol Briggs of Lowell.

Fallasburg one-room schoolhouse.

Copyright (c) 2022. Emma Blogs, LLC. All rights reserved.

Lowell author Emma Palova pens The Lost Town

Lowell author & reporter Emma Palova completed The Lost Town, a third book in the Shifting Sands series on the last day of June.

The historical fiction novel is set in Singapore, MI, a ghost town on the shores of Lake Michigan during the pioneer era of the 1830s.

The Lost Town cover by graphic artist Jeanne Boss of Rockford.

Palova captured the spirit of the once thriving lumbering town in its main characters – beautiful Miss Ida, her boss lumber baron John Bosch, Singapore founder Oshea Wilder and supporting characters, Sir Artemas Wallace and housemaid Mrs. Fisch.

Miss Ida was torn between her hometown of Chicago and her new home Singapore, and between two men. Who will win her heart?

The story unravels as the greedy New York investors set their eyes on the undeveloped land at the Oxbow bend in the Kalamazoo River surrounded by sand dunes with much coveted white pines.

Wily Oshea established the New York & Michigan Co. in 1836 to facilitate the development of Singapore. The investors envisioned that Singapore would rival Chicago and Milwaukee. With its humming mills, boarding houses, hotels, and general stores at the height of its prosperity, Singapore almost outshone Chicago.

The name remains a mystery, as its famous counterpart island city in East Asia was only a fledgling town at the time.

“The mysterious name inspired me to write this novel,” Palova said.

According to one interpretation, the exotic name was used to honor the “singing sands” of the Lake Michigan shore. The shape of the grains and the moisture combine to make the sand sing or squeak when someone walks on it.

Always on the hunt for stories and inspiration, Palova walked into the general store on Butler Street in downtown Saugatuck in the mid- 1990s. She picked up a book about Singapore and checked out the historic marker in front of the Saugatuck Village Hall.

“The story just gripped my imagination and stayed with me throughout the years,” she said. “Then I forgot all about it for decades.”

It wasn’t until getting ready for the National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo) last November, that Palova realized that what she had planned to write about Singapore would turn into a novel rather than just a short story.

“I wanted to do the fascinating story of Singapore its justice,” she said. “I knew a short story wouldn’t cut it.”

During her research for the novel, Palova came across Singapore’s ‘wildcat bank.’

“I knew this was big,” she said, “bigger than life.”

Singapore had a ‘wildcat bank’ that issued its own ornate bank notes that are still in the collection of the Saugatuck Douglas Historical Society in Douglas.

“I used their online collections catalog exclusively for research,” she said. “It’s an excellent tool for anyone who wants to write about history. Most historical societies in Michigan have online collections.”

The novel covers the entire span of Singapore’s existence from the 1830s to its demise in the 1870s. At one point the town was known as Ellis Island since it accepted immigrants from European countries like Norway and Holland. The town was the first stop for Hollanders before they moved further up north and established Holland. It came before Saugatuck which was smaller and known as Flats.

“I wove nautical stories into the novel because I love the seas,” Palova said. “I wish I was a sailor.”

It was not just a lumbering era, but also a time for steamers, schooners, and tugboats on the Great Lakes. Nautical transportation was just as dangerous as travel by land, and later by rail.

“Sometimes the story evolved all on its own to my surprise like in the chapter ‘Mail fraud at Oxbow’, she said. “I was really surprised at what Ida was capable of doing driven by secret love.”

Other chapters were meticulously planned with research usually showing up later in the novel.

“My previous research didn’t help me much, but the immediate research during the NaNoWriMo challenge helped,” she said. “I can easily say that this novel is a direct product of the challenge.”

During NaNoWriMo, Palova wrote a minimum of 1,750 words daily to reach the victory lane at 50,000 words by the end of November. After that came months of more writing, revisions, and editing.

Carol Briggs of Lowell edited The Lost Town. The whimsical cover was designed by graphic artist Jeanne Boss of Rockford. Beta readers include Nancy Price Stroosnyder and author Diana Kathryn Wolfe-Plopa.

Emma’s ease at mixing actual history into her stories is remarkable, and so entails Miss Ida’s response to an invitation to a soon-to-be bustling “Singapore” on the shores of Lake Michigan.  She is transported away from Chicago, family, and friends.  She quickly learns the duties expected of her in maintaining a boarding house and warehouse in the rapidly growing community.  Soon she falls in love with one of the corrupt founders.  The many colorful characters weave a fantastic story of love, mystery, hope, and faith.  This is a quick, very worthwhile read!

                                                                                Nancy Price Stroosnyder

The book is now available for pre-order on Amazon at https://www.amazon.com/Emma-Palova/e/B0711XJ6GY

Palova will be signing her new book at the following locations: Fallasburg Summer Celebration on July 30, Englehardt Library in Lowell TBA, Holland, Aug. 6, and Paradise, Aug. 19-20. Listen in to an upcoming podcast about The Lost Town on http://emmapalova123.podbean.com

The Cover

The cover of The Lost Town was designed by graphic artist Jeanne Boss or Rockford.

St. Wenceslas name day in the Czech Republic, a national holiday

St. Wenceslas Statue in Prague.

By Emma Palova

Today is my dad Vaclav Konecny’s name day, and my brother’s as well. Vaclav is the regular modernized version of Wenceslas, which was a royal name for the kings of Bohemia. It is a national holiday in the Czech Republic also known as ‘Czech Statehood Day’ that has been celebrated since 2000.

Sept. 28 is the feast day of St. Wenceslas, the patron saint of Bohemia, and it commemorates his death in 935. St. Wenceslas was the duke of Bohemia and the patron saint of the Czech Republic. Unfortunately, he was the victim of a murder plot orchestrated by Boleslav, who was his own brother. People celebrate this feast with festivals around the nation.

The main square in Prague is called “Vaclavak” or Vaclavske Namesti. It’s more a boulevard than a square and it is the busiest place in Prague, and traditionally a place for gatherings and manifestations, the site of Christmas markets. The statue of St. Wenceslas adorns the boulevard at the top along with the National Museum.

Throughout the years, “Vaclavak”, originally known as Konsky Trh or Horse Market, has witnessed many demonstrations, both sad and joyful events; invasion of Soviet tanks in 1968, demonstrations against the Soviet occupation, 1989 Velvet Revolution demonstrations and demonstrations on Sept. 3 of this year against the current government.

A big celebration planned for Wenceslas Square on Sept. 28, 2022 has been canceled due to security reasons, as a protest is scheduled to take place on the square. The protest called “Czech Republic First” is taking place right now.

“Vaclavak” is the site of a big seasonal market offering beers, food, and souvenirs.

Happy name day to my father Vaclav who inspired my memoir Greenwich Meridian Memoir about our family immigration saga from former Czechoslovakia to the USA.

Copyright (c) 2022. Emma Blogs, LLC. All rights reserved.

Author Emma @Earth Stories Jewelry on Blue Coast Artist tour in Saugatuck

Blue Coast Artists tour, Oct. 1 & 2

Lowell author Emma Palova will be signing her new book ‘The Lost Town’ at Earth Stories Jewelry during the Blue Coast Artist tour on Oct. 1 & 2 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. The gallery (station 7 on the map) is located one mile south of Saugatuck/Douglas, which is the setting of this historical fiction novel.

The Lost Town historical fiction novel. Cover by Jeanne Boss.

The Lost Town press release

Lowell, MI – The Lost Town, a historical fiction novel set in the ghost town of Singapore during the pioneer era of the 1830s, is the third book in the Shifting Sands series published in the summer of 2022.

Author Emma Palova of Lowell captured the spirit of the once thriving lumbering town in its main characters beautiful Miss Ida of Chicago and her boss lumber baron John Bosch.

The story unravels as the greedy New York investors set their eyes on the undeveloped land at the Oxbow bend in the Kalamazoo River surrounded by sand dunes with the much-coveted white pines.

Wily Oshea established the New York & Michigan Co. to facilitate the development of Singapore in 1836. The investors envisioned that Singapore would rival Chicago and Milwaukee. With its humming mills, boarding houses, hotels, and general stores at the height of its prosperity, Singapore almost outshone Chicago.

The name remains a mystery, as its famous counterpart island city in East Asia was only a fledgling town at the time.

“The mysterious name inspired me to write this novel,” Palova said.

The novel covers the entire span of Singapore’s existence from the 1830s to its demise in the 1870s. At one point the town was known as Ellis Island since it accepted immigrants from European countries like Norway and Holland. The town was the first stop for Hollanders before they moved further up north and established Holland. It existed before Saugatuck which was smaller and known as Flats.

According to one interpretation, the exotic name was used to honor the “singing sands” of the Lake Michigan shore. The shape of the grains and the moisture combine to make the sand sing or squeak when someone walks on it. Palova will have book signings in the Greater Grand Rapids area and during Blue Coast Artists event on Oct. 1 & 2 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. at Earth Stories Jewelry at 2742 68th St. Fennville.

The Lost Town in the media

WGVU Morning Show with Shelley Irwin, Sept. 14

https://www.wgvunews.org/the-wgvu-morning-show/2022-09-14/the-lost-town

Holland Sentinel, Sept. 23

https://www.hollandsentinel.com/story/entertainment/books/2022/09/23/lowell-author-sets-historic-fiction-the-lost-town-in-west-michigans-singapore/69505191007/

The Lowell Ledger, July 13

Copyright (c) 2022. Emma Blogs, LLC. All rights reserved.

The Lost Town in Holland Sentinel

Check out this article in the Holland Sentinel about The Lost Town, a historic fiction novel set in the ghost town of Singapore, MI.

https://www.hollandsentinel.com/story/entertainment/books/2022/09/23/lowell-author-sets-historic-fiction-the-lost-town-in-west-michigans-singapore/69505191007/

To be continued

Author Frank Wilson pens Hearts of Fire, fantasy novel

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-a9kuv-12cf29a

What happens when you mix humans, centaurs, war, relationship challenges with family friends, and magic in a fantasy land of forests, villages, and castles?

Hearts of Fire is an exciting and engaging fantasy especially written for young people that tells a beautiful story of a young girl who has to deal with the untimely death of her beloved father, a long and dangerous journey through unknown territory in search of her mother and brother, and encounters with soldiers of war and enemies out to capture her.

This fascinating book is filled with exquisitely detailed descriptions of the different landscapes and locales encountered by the heroine as she deals with her emotions and makes often difficult decisions about loyalties to family and friends past, present, and future.

All of the imaginative characters in the story are so very well thought out and described that readers can make a complete picture in their minds as they turn each page.

“You write what you read and I love fantasy and sci-fi,” said Detroit author Frank Wilson about his Heart of Fire, book no. one in the three-part series. “Let the characters tell you what to do.”

Listen in for a chance to win signed copies of all three books in the series.

Sponsored by Doc Chavent and The Lowell Ledger

 

Franciscan Rhythms 5K Trail Run Walk

The Franciscan Rhythms Trail Run Walk to raise funds for the Music Therapy Program is set for Oct.1 at the Lowell Campus of FLPC.

So what sets this 5K apart from the rest?

Music. There will be seven music stations at the different turning points on the trail. The music works as a motivator to overcome challenges on the trail.

I checked out the trails today at the Franciscan Life Process Center. It was just before it started to rain. Once you cross the wooden bridge the trail winds uphill.

It was very calm and peaceful by the old apple trees and the picnic area overlooking the rolling hills and meadows.

The temperature drop from yesterday’s 80s into the 60s made it feel like fall. The nature trail was well groomed and widened since the last time I went there.

The seasons are marvelous on the trails. The entire trail system encompasses 4 miles or 6.4 km on three different loops.

I met people on the trail at the foot of the hill with retreat yurts which is rather unusual. I noticed that new Sisters have professed their vows in 2021 by the Stations of the Cross.

Register online today at

https://runsignup.com/franciscanrhythmstrailrun

Sunday afternoon @Fallasburg

By Emma Palova

It was a great Sunday afternoon, Sept. 18, 2022 at the Fallasburg one-room schoolhouse. We enjoyed a steady stream of visitors, from far and near. Docent Tom Vaughn let the visitors ring the school bell in the bell tower, and lead them into the backroom with the Fallasburg village model in its late 1860s heyday. Old maps and photos attracted a lot of attention.

My new book The Lost Town set in the ghost town of Singapore continues its successful streak into the fall as we get closer to Halloween. Most people have never heard of Singapore in Michigan. Neither have I until I stumbled across the historic marker in front of the Singapore Village Hall sometime in the mid-1990s.

I would like to thank the @Fallasburg Historical Society for hosting another one of my book signings during the Fallasburg Fall Festival, which has become a tradition.

Copyright (c) 2022. Emma Blogs, LLC. All rights reserved.

Author Mark Love pens The Wayward Path

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-8hapi-12c5420

This is the third book in the Jefferson Chene mystery series, in which author Mark Love follows the case of the retired mobster Leo Agonasti based on popular demand. Love lived for many years in the metro Detroit area, where crime and corruption are always prevalent. Working as a freelance reporter, Love came across interesting situations and discrepancies between police agencies.

Victim Charity Gray was an intelligent, inquisitive teen who disappeared fifteen years earlier. When her body is discovered, it should be a typical cold case. Before the Detroit police can get started, the FBI commandeers the investigation, with a prime suspect in mind: retired mobster Agonasti.
When Agonasti slips through their grasp, he reaches out to Sergeant Jefferson Chene. Their unusual friendship draws Chene into the thick of the case. Burdened with two reluctant FBI agents, Chene is working against the clock and the feds to find the real killer.
Listen in for a chance to win a signed copy of The Wayward Path.

Sponsored by Doc Chavent and The Lowell Ledger

Remembering 9/11

A minute of silence for the victims and the heroes

Updated Sept. 11, 2022

On this rainy late Sunday afternoon, I reflect back on that dreadful day 21 years ago. I have just unpacked from a trip Up North for the wedding of Anthony and Tori trying to gather my thoughts after an emotional week.

September 11, 2001

It was a Tuesday morning and the week was young waiting to be filled with reporting of the unknown news in the small community of Ionia. Nothing out of the ordinary; a few township and school board meetings and some nice human interest stories with heartwarming pictures of kids back in school.

That perspective changed in a few minutes.

As I was listening to the finance committee reports by the Ionia County treasurer Nancy, little did I know that ominous day will fill the newscasts around the world for years to come.

I looked up from my notes and saw the county administrator’s face twist in a grimace of total disbelief and dismay as he watched in shock the attacks on the towers on his laptop. He shared the news with us and dissolved the meeting.

Disbelief ensued and we left the meeting to watch the attacks at our office of the Ionia Sentinel-Standard in Ionia with my colleagues, editor Val Gaus, reporters Brandon Lacic and Katelyn.

I remember the immense silence after the airplanes were grounded for four days. I also remember a story we did about a preaching pastor, that we got into trouble for doing it.

“He was preaching,” said publisher Val Rose.

The newspaper headlines varied: “A day of infamy.” For some reason, I remember that one the most. Then my dad came over in the evening to consult the situation, while mom was in the Czech Republic and thought it was a horror movie on TV.

The patriotism that followed was amazing, as well as the camaraderie of the people. I hope the memories will never fade away for the sake of the people who died during the catastrophe.

Right now, I am still at a loss for words. I always hold a minute of silence for all the victims.

Copyright (c) 2022. Emma Blogs, LLC. All rights reserved.

Lowell author Gladys Fletcher pens memoir My Garden of Stones

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-h7dfb-12bc76f

How would you respond if told by your parents you could not marry the love of your life… That special someone you had known since the age of seven?
 
 
Fletcher’s book is an autobiography, a memoir, and a biography of her husband Al to whom she was a caregiver for 59 years. This is a journey of two determined people through their garden of stones overcoming hurdles that could have destroyed a marriage, but God was good, always, even performing miracles.
 

From eloping to living happily ever after with Al, the forbidden love of her life, Fletcher captures significant moments with a dose of nostalgia and a bit of humor.

At the age of 85, Gladys Fletcher published her first book after taking a few memoir writing classes at Calvin University in Grand Rapids.

“At 80, I decided to do something,” she said. “At first I just wanted to leave a legacy for my children, but the instructor encouraged me to write a book.”

“You’ve got more to share than just with your family,” the instructor said.

Fletcher shut the door and meditated while sitting in front of the computer for hours. In two years, she had a book.

“I had to write it chronologically,” she said. “I was honest. It’s all true.”

Listen in to Fletcher’s great feats together with Al who was handicapped with rheumatoid arthritis and graduated from Lowell High School at Mary Free Bed in 1941.

Sponsored by Doc Chavent and The Lowell Ledger

EW This WordPress.com site is about Emma's Writings.

%d bloggers like this: