Tag Archives: eye surgeon

Eyeology with Dr. Verdier

New eyes one year later

By Emma Palova

EW Emma’s Writings

Grand Rapids, MI- It’s been exactly a year since I’ve had surgeries to remove cataracts from both eyes. The process took close to two months at the Verdier Eye Center in Grand Rapids.

In May, I went almost completely blind to a point where I could no longer drive or write because I couldn’t see the computer screen or the windshield. And that’s exactly what a cataract is- a dirty windshield or lights on the car. Some cataracts take years to develop, mine only took two years from the first consultation. They don’t necessarily just strike older people, which is also one of common misconceptions.

Verdier Eye Center
Dr. David Verdier, a recognized eye surgeon

I couldn’t see the TV screen, so I couldn’t do my yoga practice. I cried hard. I was afraid I wouldn’t be able to see my son Jake and daughter-in-law Maranda at their wedding on Oct. 25.

I knew Dr. David Verdier from earlier stories that I had written for Advance Newspapers and Gemini Publications about his worldwide work for Orbis. He is a well-known eye surgeon who brought to West Michigan subspecialty skills of modern corneal transplantation and external eye diseases, cataract removal and intraocular lens implantation.

Dr. Verdier is recognized by his peers as a member of The Best Doctors in America, Who’s Who in the World, Who’s Who in Medicine and Health Care and Who’s Who in American Education.

As such other ophthalmologists have to recommend you to get to him. I asked my eye doctor Holzer that I want Dr. Verdier to do the surgery.

“You’ll have to wait to get in, but he’s worth waiting for,” said Dr. Holzer.

The whole process took several visits to the eye center, but it was well worth it.  I overheard some patients waiting for the surgery say, that it is a frivolous surgery.

I would never call any surgery, a frivolous affair. It was done under local anesthesia and with an anesthesiologist present. The prep time for it took two hours.

After eye surgery
After eye surgery

Today, one year later I still don’t need eye glasses because Dr. Verdier also implanted lenses into my eyes that corrected the vision. I carry patient lens implant identification cards on me.

I am grateful to Dr. Verdier for his expertise and for “Taking my eyes to heart.” I even got a plant Kalanchoe to get well. Both, the plant and my eyes are doing well.

Here are the links to last year’s stories grouped in a mini-series “New Eyes with Dr. Verdier.”

https://emmapalova.com/2014/09/06/new-eyes-with-dr-verdier/

https://emmapalova.com/2014/09/13/new-eyes-with-dr-verdier-3/

https://emmapalova.com/2014/10/01/new-eyes-with-dr-verdier-iii/

https://emmapalova.com/2014/10/21/new-eyes-with-dr-verdier-iv/

Copyright © 2015 Emma Blogs, LLC. All rights reserved.

New eyes with Dr. Verdier II

The evaluation of the cataracts

By Emma Palova

EW Emma’s Writings

Note: This is the second part in the mini-series about Emma Palova’s journey from near blindness to new eyes with 20/20 vision. It is a story about cataracts that cause blurred vision.

The first part “Eyes set on Dr. Verdier” was published on EW Emma’s Writings http://emmapalova.com on Sept. 6.

The evaluation

Grand Rapids, MI – I was in at the Verdier Eye Center for an evaluation of the cataracts on July 11.

“Sweet,” said Dr. Nate Schlotthauer as he examined my right eye after dilating it with eye drops.

He called in a technician to look at the “perfect” cataract that plagues younger people than 60. Hereditary factors play a role in the fast-moving cataracts, as well as exposure to the sun, and birthdays, according to Schlotthauer.

I could not read the chart with rows of letters during the examination.

“It’s like looking through a foggy window that gets foggier as more layers are added,” said Schlotthauer. “Only a surgery can fix that. If you live long enough, you will eventually develop a cataract.”

I looked around me in the dark room with the expensive optical equipment and I wondered where the surgery will take place.

Optical equipment at the Verdier Eye Center
Optical equipment at the Verdier Eye Center

“Dr. Verdier will come now to see you,” said Schlotthauer.

Smiling Verdier with curly blonde hair walked in fast. I slightly remembered him from the story interview almost 10 years ago. Little did I know that I would be needing his eye care.

“I can’t drive. I can’t write and I can’t see myself in the mirror,” I described the fast progression of the cataract in the right eye. I have trouble seeing you doctor.”

Verdier examined the cataract nodding his head.

Dr. David Verdier, a recognized eye surgeon
Dr. David Verdier, a recognized eye surgeon

“We’ll fix you up. We’re going to do the right eye first,” he said. “Don’t worry. But remember, you still might need eyeglasses. Look at me.”

A technician flooded my right eye and performed measurements of the eyeball for the future lens implant that will replace the natural lens with the cataract. She also made me an appointment with the family doctor to make sure that I was fit for a surgery.”

“Okay, you’re all set for July 22,” she said.

The Verdier Eye Care office center is located on the main floor of the 1000 E. Paris building. It is a network of hallways, examining and waiting rooms, almost like a glass house labyrinth. Technicians in Cherokee blue uniforms were running around.

Boards with blinking lights showed which rooms were occupied. Clearly there was a system and an order underlying the chaos.

I got my Patient Information booklet about the upcoming surgery. My husband picked up the prescribed Polytrim ad Prednisolone eye drops for me. I was all set.

About the featured photo; This is what objects seem  like with a cataract.

For more information on eye surgeries go to http://www.verdiereyecenter.com

To be continued with “The surgery”

Copyright © 2014 story by Emma Palova