Tag Archives: young adult fictio…

YA author Melanie Hooyenga transports main character in ”Flicker” back in time

 

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-zc7pg-112bfec

What would you change if you could go back to yesterday?

 
The main character Biz in Hooyenga’s young adult book “Flicker” discovers that she has a special ability; she uses sunlight to jump back to yesterday. She takes advantage of flickering by retaking Trig tests, fixing fights with her boyfriend (or reliving the making up), and repeating pretty much anything that could be done better. Trouble is, flickering makes her head explode from the inside. Or feel like it anyway.

 

No one knows about her freakish ability and she’s content to keep it that way. Guys don’t stick around because she refuses to let them in, but all that changes when Cameron, her best friend, starts looking oh-so-yummy. Suddenly she’s noticing his biceps, his smile, and the cute way his eyes crinkle when he—gah! This is her friend!

But the butterflies come to a screeching halt when little girls start disappearing, then take a nosedive when the police link the kidnappings to Cameron’s sister, who vanished years earlier. As the police grasp for clues, Biz photographs a strange man lurking in the shadows and realizes that her flickering can help more than just herself.

 
Listen to the episode for details of the giveaway. Contact Melanie through her website to receive a free signed book.
 
 
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Author D.A. Reed addresses teen depression, suicide and homelessness in her new books

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-3mh4d-1113e3a

Author D. A. Reed delivers a message of hope to struggling teens, their parents and educators in her young adult novels “All The Things We Didn’t See” and “Nothin’ but Gutters and Change.”

“There is always help,” she said. “As a society, we need to eradicate the stigma around mental illness. I didn’t realize it was such a big problem.”

After writing twice about difficult issues for teens, Reed realized that she need to be aware, that these problems exist in society.

“People approached me to write about depression and suicide,” she said.

At first she balked at the issues, but then Reed buckled up to bring awareness to serious problems that people are struggling with.

“I made sure to write it in a way so it’s not that intense that people wouldn’t want to read about it,” she said. 

Reed found a balance between stating the truth correctly while injecting some sarcastic humor into the stories.

“I always try to find that silver lining in difficult situations,” she said.