Tag Archives: spring equinox

Spring Equinox

Excerpt from “Shifting Sands: Secrets”

On the first day of spring, I drove to the nearby Murray Lake for inspiration and meditation to finish the last story in the new book “Shifting Sands: Secrets” slated for spring publication.

The lake was thawing and the ducks were bathing in the fresh streams.

It was only me, a diehard ice fisherman and a curious blue heron perched on a piece of floating ice. Later, it started snowing mixed together with rain.

I had to get out of the car to get a photo of that brave man, who was literally floating on the remaining ice. The man was totally oblivious to his surroundings.

Did I find my inspiration?

I have to answer the question: I did find inspiration on the shores of a water body. This time 1,000 miles up North from where I found the first pieces of inspiration on the Gulf for the following story.

Excerpt from “Six Palms by the Tiki”

“What kind of secrets were hiding in those calcium skeletons built by slimy mollusks that have no spine?” Amora often wondered.

After all, the mollusks were long dead when washed ashore eaten by another sea creature. Most big shells had broken fringes and fragments of shells were more usual than whole intact shells. To find shells still attached to each other was out of the norm completely.

Amora paid $2 for a cup of Venetian coffee at Papa’s. The hot dark liquid still steaming vaguely reminded her of mornings Up North. Seadog George was always available for a chat. He had a tan of a sailor and considered himself to be one, since he had spent the last 15 years on the pier’s deck hovering 20 feet above water.

“Do you ever get seasick?” asked Amora naively searching George’s tanned hardened by wind and sun.

“Sometimes, I do when the wind is high and the pier sways in the waves,” he said. “But they built to withstand anything from Brazilian swamp wood that has already grown in water.”

Tall seadog George wasn’t a native of Florida, although he wished he was. Once he tried to pretend in front of tourists that he was a Floridian.

“Come on buddy, you sound like the Yankees, you can’t lose that,” laughed the New Yorker. “I am a fourth generation Yankee, I know.”

From then on, George stopped pretending. With blonde hair matching the tan and the beard, Amora guessed he must have been Norwegian or Swedish. She hasn’t found the guts yet to ask him; Amora didn’t want to be either too friendly or too nosy, or worse yet: Seadog George could think she was hitting on him.

She only engaged enough in casual talk to finish the cup of Venetian coffee without having to walk with it.

Copyright (c) 2019. Emma Blogs, LLC. All rights reserved.

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First day of spring

Reigning in the spring equinox energy

By Emma Palova

EW Emma’s Writings

Lowell, MI- The first day of spring means new beginnings to me after the long winter. And even though everything is yellowish brown outside, I have a vision of everything turning green soon.

As I drove to a meeting this afternoon, there were still tree limbs on the sides of the road, remnants of the last winter storms with high winds.

However, by the parking lot, I found some new green stems pushing out of the hard ground. Also some trees are starting to show tiny buds and the willows branches have a sharp yellow color.

My friends at the meeting said they were excited about the afternoon because they would be outside picking sticks from their yards.

“Yes, picking sticks sounds good,” T.G. laughed. “I also have a great spring report.”

Spring equinox
Spring equinox signifies new life.

I couldn’t agree more. After long months of being trapped inside, anything outdoors sounds good.

T.G.’s spring report turned great as well. You can see it in the feature photo. T.G. has a beef cattle breeding farm. And with it spring brings calves, new life. The pictured black Angus cow just gave birth on the first day of spring to the calf  by her out in the pastures.

According to T.G., this breed of cows, always gives birth to calves outside, not in the stables.

Annually, I take an inventory of the past winter and the toll it has taken on life. Some of our dearest have not survived the winter. We have lost my dad’s last living sibling, Aunt Marta. She passed away on January 7, 2017 in Stipa, Czech Republic. In February, we lost our first neighbor on Downes Street, whom we met, when we moved out into the country in 1995. That was Allegonda (Connie) Kazemier, born in the Netherlands.

The Lowell community lost a great artist, Jan Johnson, who has inspired generations of artists in the Greater Grand Rapids area.

But, I also look at the positives that have come out of this winter’s hibernation.

Winter gives me an opportunity to focus on some things that go unnoticed during the pretty live seasons of spring, summer and fall.

This may include projects that I have been procrastinating in finishing. Most of them have much to do with writing, and the development of writing projects.

But, this time I’d like to write about personal development, and by this I don’t mean weight loss or other personal gains and losses.

Over the winter, I’ve changed a lot of things in my lifestyle. I still suffer from insomnia, so I use the early morning hours to meditate and to organize my thoughts.

This gives me sort of head start into the new day. I like to go through daily readings in the morning before I start writing. It’s still dark outside, and I can only hear the fan by the wood stove humming. Sometimes, I see the Big Dipper in the northeast corner of my studio view.

I am not as dead set on goals as I used to be. As long as I get through some piles on my desk, and see sentences materialize in front of me.

I enjoy discovering new blogs. I find them a constant source of inspiration, and support. I found support in  the Daily Post prompt @luck last Friday on St. Pat’s Day.  As I browsed other blogs, I came across “My Invisible Illnesses.” The author among other things writes about fibromyalgia, a mysterious condition, that some docs laugh at.

Over the winter, I’ve learned to nurture my love for art so I can share it with others.

I’ve gained new appreciation for our Konecny family roots in the Konecny Saga, and I am working on how to share this so others can do their research as well.

I immerse myself in arts for reprieve and inspiration.

I still like to develop new projects on top of unfinished ones. I know it’s a no no, but I usually get back to the unfinished stuff as well.

I have discovered that the energy behind different projects keeps changing. Sometimes it rekindles old feelings, and gives them new light.

With spring I like to refocus and reign in some of that spring equinox energy. The warm sun is doing wonders on the mind and the spirit, as I pull tight jeans over the body.

I’ve increased the spiritual awareness of being and existence with the help of many of my spiritualist friends. I will dedicate a separate chapter to them, as I credit them with a lot of my improved health-being.

I am looking forward to this spring with a new set of eyes of appreciation and gratitude for simply being.

I dedicate this Spring Equinox Energy post to my son Jakub Pala.

“We did it,” said Josephine Marie Palova, at the end of a week-long babysitting sting in Hastings.

Yes, we did it. We made it through winter stronger.

 

 

Copyright © 2017. Emma Blogs, LLC. All rights reserved.

Spring equinox

Spring sojourns

By Emma Palova

EW Emma’s Writings

Lowell, MI- Watch for a story on spring sojourns in Venice, Florida on the Gulf Coast, locally in Michigan, and globally in Europe.

Today, March 20th, is the spring equinox. It is called equinox because the length of day and night are nearly equal.

Spring equinox signifies new life.
Spring equinox signifies new life.

It is also the day of the total and partial solar eclipses depending on location, according to timeanddate.com

The first day of spring is traditionally associated with many customs like Easter and Passover. It is also a time for new beginnings and new life. Thus the symbol of the rabbit, a lamb and eggs.

Easter lamb baked like a pound cake with decorated eggs.
Czech Easter lamb baked like a pound cake with decorated eggs.

In many Christian cultures, Easter eggs are synonymous with Easter. Also known as Paschal eggs, these are usually decorated chicken eggs that symbolize fertility and rebirth. They can be quite exquisite, and in many cases are considered an art.

Many Easter related events feature the Easter egg as the central theme. Traditional games like egg hunts, where colorful Easter eggs are hidden for children to find, egg rolling, where eggs are rolled down a hill, and egg dancing, where eggs are laid on the floor and people dance while trying to not damage them are held all around the world.

related links http://www.timeanddate.com

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