Category Archives: Easter

Good Friday

The Good Friday commemoration of the Christ’s passion took place at  3 p.m. today at Saint Pat’s Church in Parnell. One billion catholics around the world sat in silence to observe Christ’s death.

“We wait in silence,” said Father Mark Peacock.

During this liturgy, the narrator, the priest and the crowd read the scriptures according to John in a powerful ceremony.

I find the Passion script, that was also read on Palm Sunday, fascinating. I am not surprised it has been worked into a movie.

Photos are coming.

In conclusion, the faithful venerated the Cross. Saturday is the vigil of Easter that takes place in the chapel.

The Triduum invites all to enter without reserve into the mystery and death unto resurrection in Christ Jesus.

Easter Sunday is the culmination of all these liturgies.

Copyright (c) 2017. Emma Blogs, LLC. All rights reserved.

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Easter Triduum

The Paschal Triduum  started tonight with the Mass of the Lord’s Supper, and it runs through Easter Sunday on April 16.

This week is also known as the Holy Week in the catholic calendar.

The mass at Saint Pat’s included a candle vigil and procession to chapel for repose with washing of the feet. The mass with procession lasted just under two hours.

Tomorrow is Good Friday. Watch for the readings of the Christ’s passion. The Christ’s passion written by several writers has served over the centuries as an inspiration for many literary works due to its powerful message.

Mel Gibson’s 2004 film “The Passion of the Christ” stirred some controversy, unlike the 1973 “Jesus Christ Superstar.”

Follow me for more Easter coverage through Easter Sunday including Easter traditions in Czech Republic.

Copyright (c) 2017. Emma Blogs, LLC. All rights reserved.

 

Writer’s love picks for February

February drives creative work to fruition

By Emma Palova

EW Emma’s Writings

There is something about the month of February, you can call it atmospheric . I was thinking that even before I heard that at a therapeutic meeting earlier this week.

Maybe it’s the overall ambience of the month in between the deep freeze of January and the much coveted  arrival of spring in March. If I were to pin the season to the catholic calendar, it is usually the purple time of Lent, except for this year since Lent arrives late with Ash Wednesday falling on March 1.

“Everything is going to be late this year,” my husband Ludek, a chronic complainer, said. “We’re going to have a late Easter.”

No kidding, the Easter Sunday falls on April 16 this year. But, the good news is, the trees here Up North in Michigan will have leaves, and maybe even early blossoms and spring flowers.

We had rain on Tuesday, grayish nothing on Wednesday, a deep freeze on Thursday along with a creepy full moon, and now we are recovering from 20 plus minus degree temperature swings as the work week finally wraps up.

My body” loves” these roller coaster temperatures, and my mind and mood swing accordingly with them.

With the sunshine on Monday, I was at a reasonable high as I met with friends at the “Gathering Place” to discuss progress in our common therapy.

“You know, this really works, let’s do it next Monday again,” T. G. as always was very encouraging.

“I have a lot more stories to tell,” said our new buddy Wendy.

And the mid-week meeting somewhere in the woods next to the old stage-coach road was also a success, all things considered.

I do feel grateful for this overall February gap in between the novelty of the new year 2017 and the onset of spring. This February gap finally allowed me to fill the empty spaces on my huge 17-months desktop calendar with my creative work.

Along with Ludek, we made an executive decision that I will self-publish my collection of short stories “Glass Flowers” Copyright (c)2017 Emma Palova. On Thursday, I started pulling the collection of 20-some short stories together after literally years of searching the publishing “maze.”

That search included everything from participating in Writer’s Digest Annual Writing Contests, submitting my short stories to literary magazines, of which, many no longer exist, submitting manuscripts to Writer’s Conferences and of course looking for an agent.

This all-inclusive escapade involved interviews with sales people from several publishing houses that have gone the self-publishing route as well.

“You know Amazon is moving quite fast on this,” said the sales person from Author’s Publish. “We’re keeping an eye on them.”

“Thank you Mr. E. for the tip,” I concluded a series of several hour-long phone interviews after my ear almost fell off. I decided to join the self-publishing mainstream.

Stay tuned for more of my “Publishing Escapades.” Have a great weekend, and a great February. Don’t forget it’s the month of the heart and love. Valentine’s Day is on Tuesday, Feb. 14.

Also some neat events this weekend include:

“Champagne and chocolates” at the Flat River Gallery in downtown Lowell this Saturday from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.

For more info go to http://www.flatrivergalleryandframing.com

Screening of the “Interlude” at the Urban Institute of Contemporary Arts  in Grand Rapids.

http://www.uica.org

Love always,

Emma

This post is also in response to the Daily Post prompt @Ambience

Ambience

Copyright (c) 2017. Emma Blogs, LLC. All rights reserved.

Memoir highlights Czech & Slovak Easter traditions

Easter evokes memories

By Emma Palova

EW Emma’s Writings

Lowell, MI-In my memoir “Greenwich Meridian,” I write about Czech and Slovak traditions that I have witnessed while living in Czechoslovakia with a touch of nostalgia. Some of them disappeared along with the old regimes, but most have survived mainly in villages and small towns preserved by enthusiastic small groups of people. The traditions are reflected in festive costumes for the holidays and special events, in music, dance, food, and customs specific to each village and town.

We lived in Zlin, Moravia, which is the central part of former Czechoslovakia embedded in traditions. Both as a child and an adult, I lived and visited with my grandparents in Vizovice, a treasure trove of traditions.

cousin Bronislav Pink
cousin Bronislav Pink
Czech & Slovak Easter kraslice
Czech & Slovak Easter kraslice

Easter celebrations in Czech and some other European countries are longer by one day, and that is Monday.
We have always indulged in lavish preparations for the long Easter weekend. That meant having enough meat, desserts, eggs, and beverages for three days. There were long lines just like before any major holiday. I spent a lot of time standing in lines and listening to what the old broads had to say.
“I am not going to tell him how much I spent,” a woman  wearing a scarf and a fluffy skirt shook her head defiantly.
The other one with an apron over her dress smelled of burnt dough.
I thought, she must have burnt her kolache, a traditional festive pastry with plum butter.
The broad leaned closer to the first one and whispered something into her ear. Then they both laughed, until their bellies and chests were heaving up and down. I learned a lot standing in lines. The longer the line, the more I learned.
So, the culmination of it all is Easter Monday known for its “schmigrust,” an old whipping custom.

Traditional Czech festive costumes.
Traditional Czech festive costumes.

On that day, early in the morning ,large groups of boys and young men head out into the streets with their braided knot-grass whips or oversized wooden spoons decorated with ribbons. The day before, they spent many hours skillfully braiding their whips out of willow twigs or scouring the house for the biggest wooden spoon.
The boys go door to door, reciting traditional Easter carols like “Hody, hody doprovody,” asking the lady of the house for painted eggs. Then, they whip all the present females in exchange for decorated eggs and ribbons. Single women, and girls tied ribbons on top of the whip. I always wondered about the whipping custom, long before I ever set my foot out into the world. One day, grandma Anna finally explained it to me.
“It is supposed to resemble the whipping of Christ before he died,” she said.
“But, grandma that’s evil,” I cried.
Grandma just shrugged, and turned away. Later in life, I knew better than to question a tradition.
The elders in the group were offered shots of plum brandy, usually home made or acquired through bartering. Even family members took part in this ritual. Uncles and cousins were invited inside for coffee, festive desserts such as kolache, shots and meaningful conversation.
On a good year, and especially when I was a teenager, we got anywhere around 100 passionate revelers. Sometimes, I ran out of ribbons. The boys and young men, competing against each other, took pride in the number of ribbons they got. The craft stores had to stock up with meters and meters of ribbons, plain or embroidered. The hens, of course, felt obligated to produce more eggs.

Happy Easter 2016 to all.

Copyright © 2016 Emma Blogs, LLC. All rights reserved.

Easter Monday in Czech Republic

Easter Monday traditions in Czech & Slovak villages

By Emma Palova

Stipa, Czech Republic- Emma & Ella Chavent get Easter whipping with custom home-made whips on Monday. For French girl Ella, it is the first time participating in an age-old tradition. She will tie a ribbon to the whips.

According to most, the lashing does not hurt.

image

On Easter Monday in Czech Republic, boys and men in villages head out to whip girls and women of the house. In turn for the whipping, they get shots of plum brandy, eggs and treats. The tradition resembles the whipping of the Christ. It is a holiday. Most men make their own braided whips from willow branches. The big whips have 12 willow branches, that have to be soaked overnight in hot water before braiding. They also have a braided handle. The girls tie ribbons to the whips.

At the end of the day, the groups walk the sidewalks with colorful whips. The whip with the most ribbons becomes a token of pride. The most popular girls run out of ribbons.

In neighboring country Slovakia, the men pour water on the women and girls, sort of like the “bucket challenge” here., as well as the whipping.

The cold water signifies health, beauty and purification.

Here is an excerpt from a Globe & Mail article by Slovak-Canadian writer Miriam Matejova:

“My Slovak Easter traditions mixed paganism with blatant gender inequality,” she wrote. “As a naturalized Canadian, I have treasured my ability to choose the traditions I find appealing and disregard those I detest. I have come to understand that it is fine to let go of some pieces of home and adopt a few new ways instead.”

Copyright (c) Emma Blogs, LLC. All rights reserved.

 

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Happy Easter 2015

Easter traditions bring families together

By Emma Palova

EW Emma’s Writings

Lowell, MI-I would like to wish everyone a happy Easter from the EW team. So, you can enjoy it with your family and friends like we do. Our family had to celebrate early, because of our  multicultural differences.

Czech Easter traditions and symbols.
Czech Easter traditions and symbols.

We had a great time with Maranda, Jake and Josephine Palova. I even got my weight lifting in by throwing her up and down in my arms. She weighs exactly what I lift, that is 20 pounds.

For our Easter meal we had fried turkey loins with potato salad. Our appetizer featured open-faced sandwiches and classical Walachian salad or fleisch salad.

Czech Easter whipping custom.
Czech Easter whipping custom.

In the afternoon, we practiced the Czech whipping custom. In turn for whipping, Maranda and I gave shots of plum brandy to the men.

“This is great mom,” said Jake. “Just like at home.”

Easter desserts
Easter desserts
Easter eggs.
Easter eggs.

Well, back in Czech Republic, the big day is Easter Monday. Yet to come. Happy Easter to all.

For more stories on Czech Easter traditions go to CJ Aunt Jarmilka’s Desserts on http://jkarmaskova.wordpress.com

You can now subscribe to the Emma Blogs Newsletter.

Copyright (c) 2015. Emma Blogs, LLC. All rights reserved.

 

Memoir highlights Czech & Slovak Easter traditions

Easter 2015

Moravian villages  adhere to old Easter customs
Moravian villages adhere
to old Easter customs

Easter evokes memories of Czech Republic

By Emma Palova

EW Emma’s Writings

In my memoir “Greenwich Meridian,” I write about Czech and Slovak traditions that I have witnessed while living in Czechoslovakia with a touch of nostalgia. Some of them disappeared along with the old regimes, but most have survived mainly in villages and small towns preserved by enthusiastic small groups of people. Festive costumes for the holidays and special events reflect these traditions, as well as  music, dance, food, and customs specific to each village and town.

We lived in Zlin, Moravia, which is the central part of former Czechoslovakia embedded in traditions. Both as a child and an adult, I lived and visited with my grandparents in Vizovice, a treasure trove of traditions.

cousin Bronislav Pink
Cousin Bronislav Pink ready for “schmigrust”

Easter celebrations in Czech and some other European countries are longer by one day, and that is Monday.
We have always indulged in lavish preparations for the long Easter weekend. That meant having enough meat, desserts, eggs, and beverages for three days. There were long lines just like before any major holiday. I spent a lot of time standing in lines and listening to what the old broads had to say.
“I am not going to tell him how much I spent,” a woman  wearing a scarf and a fluffy skirt shook her head defiantly.
The other one with an apron over her dress smelled of burnt dough.
I thought, she must have burnt her kolache, a traditional festive pastry with plum butter.
The broad leaned closer to the first one and whispered something into her ear. Then they both laughed, until their bellies and chests were heaving up and down. I learned a lot standing in lines. The longer the line, the more I learned.
So, the culmination of it all is Easter Monday known for its “schmigrust,” an old whipping custom.

Traditional Czech festive costumes.
Traditional Czech festive costumes.

On that day, early in the morning ,large groups of boys and young men head out into the streets with their braided knot-grass whips or oversized wooden spoons decorated with ribbons. The day before, they spent many hours skillfully braiding their whips out of willow twigs or scouring the house for the biggest wooden spoon.
The boys go door to door, reciting traditional Easter carols like “Hody, hody doprovody,” asking the lady of the house for painted eggs. Then, they whip all the present women in exchange for decorated eggs and ribbons. Single women, and girls tied ribbons on top of the whip. I always wondered about the whipping custom, long before I ever set my foot out into the world. One day, grandma Anna finally explained it to me.
“It is supposed to resemble the whipping of Christ before he died,” she said.
“But, grandma that’s evil,” I cried.
Grandma just shrugged, and turned away. Later in life, I knew better than to question a tradition.

Easter desserts
Easter desserts

Women of the house offered  shots of plum brandy, usually home-made or acquired through bartering to the “schmigrust” groups. Even family members took part in this ritual. Uncles and cousins visited for coffee, festive desserts such as kolache, shots and meaningful conversation.
On a good year, and especially when I was a teenager, we got anywhere around 100 passionate revelers. Sometimes, I ran out of ribbons. The boys and young men, competing against each other, took pride in the number of ribbons they got. The craft stores had to stock up with meters and meters of ribbons, plain or embroidered. The hens, of course, felt obligated to produce more eggs.

For more on Easter desserts go to CJ Aunt Jarmilka’s Desserts on http://jkarmaskova.wordpress.com

 

Copyright © 2015 story and photos by Emma Palova, costume photo by “I love Czech Republic” photo group

Spring equinox

Spring sojourns

By Emma Palova

EW Emma’s Writings

Lowell, MI- Watch for a story on spring sojourns in Venice, Florida on the Gulf Coast, locally in Michigan, and globally in Europe.

Today, March 20th, is the spring equinox. It is called equinox because the length of day and night are nearly equal.

Spring equinox signifies new life.
Spring equinox signifies new life.

It is also the day of the total and partial solar eclipses depending on location, according to timeanddate.com

The first day of spring is traditionally associated with many customs like Easter and Passover. It is also a time for new beginnings and new life. Thus the symbol of the rabbit, a lamb and eggs.

Easter lamb baked like a pound cake with decorated eggs.
Czech Easter lamb baked like a pound cake with decorated eggs.

In many Christian cultures, Easter eggs are synonymous with Easter. Also known as Paschal eggs, these are usually decorated chicken eggs that symbolize fertility and rebirth. They can be quite exquisite, and in many cases are considered an art.

Many Easter related events feature the Easter egg as the central theme. Traditional games like egg hunts, where colorful Easter eggs are hidden for children to find, egg rolling, where eggs are rolled down a hill, and egg dancing, where eggs are laid on the floor and people dance while trying to not damage them are held all around the world.

related links http://www.timeanddate.com

Copyright (c) 2015. Emma Blogs, LLC. All rights reserved.