Category Archives: art

Popular places ArtPrize 9

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ArtPrize Grand Rapids

Thoughts on  Popular  places  in the wake of Las Vegas shooting

By Emma Palova

Grand Rapids, MI -I am beyond shocked over the Sunday night shooting in Las Vegas that killed 58 people without any connection to terror.

My husband and I just spent a fantastic Saturday in downtown Grand Rapids enjoying the most Popular arts event in the world. That is the 9th annual ArtPrize that featured 1,500 artists from 47 countries.

ArtPrize is the world’s largest competition and the most attended annual art event on the planet.

Thousands of people packed the sidewalks, the arts venues and the cafes on a beautiful sunny Saturday.

Other than seeking inspiration, the main reason why we went to ArtPrize was to cast a Popular vote for local photographer Bruce Doll for his entry, “As Grand As It Gets.”

The photo is a fabulous non-conventional take on the bottom of the Grand Canyon with a fish-eye lens.

“I thought I can never capture this,” said Doll.

In order to vote, you had to physically register in any of the ArtPrize districts  using the app in the first round of voting.

The second reason was to see  “The American Dream” by finalist Tom Kiefer. We strolled from the peaceful Hillside Veteran’s Park area to the much busier DeVos Place Convention Center on Monroe.

Kiefer photographed the personal belongings of migrants seized at the border.

“I felt a visceral connection between his art and our  farm workers,” said Teresa Hendricks, director of Migrant Legal Aid hosting the artist.

DeVos Place had the finalists’ artwork on display. We inched the skywalks between the finalists’ exhibits and the railing; sometimes without seeing the art exhibits. There was a demonstration of tattoo art among others. As I leaned across the railing to get a picture of the interior of the hall, it occurred to me.

No matter how Athletic  you were, you wouldn’t be able to run out of that glass hall with waved glass ceiling, if someone had opened fire.

We were all conveniently gathered there in the sky walks in front of the artwork, packed in the hallways. We were separated from the ground floor by escalators and elevators.

There were no security checks at the entrance.

Inside the Amway hotel, we paused by the art of “Lincoln.”

After we got out of the venue complex through a system of catwalks, and back on the street, it occurred to me again; the vulnerability of crowds. The crowds also packed the Blue Bridge and the Gillett Bridge with artists.

People gathered in front of art everywhere. After several hours, I felt nauseated from the crowds and the autumn heat.

I had to take a deep breath in front of an eagle sculpture by the Rosa Parks Circle.

It was to a certain point comforting. But that was Saturday, before the Sunday shooting in Las Vegas.

Then, everything changed.

 

Copyright (c) 2017. Emma Blogs, LLC. All rights reserved.

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Lowell artist inspires generations

IW Inspiring Women – Jan Y. Johnson

Longtime artist inspires generations embedded in Lowell area

By Emma Palova

EW Emma’s Writings

Note: The IW winter series, which leads up to the International Women’s Day on March 8, features women from all walks of life who continue to inspire others in our communities.

Inspiring women
Inspiring women

Their positions in the society are not measured by money or the accolades they receive, but by contributions to progress and well-being of all.

Nominate a woman who has inspired you for the series.

Lowell, MI – Artist Janet Y. Johnson, 86, is an icon. Together with artists late David Davis and current Kathleen Mooney, they have created an artistic legacy for generations embedded in the greater Lowell area.

Lowell artist Janet Johnson has created a legacy.
Lowell artist Janet Johnson has created a legacy.

Johnson has been a staple at the Flat River Gallery & Framing in downtown Lowell with countless exhibits of watercolor and acrylic paintings.

The gallery will celebrate its fourth anniversary with the “Let’s celebrate” event with champagne and chocolates on Feb. 11 from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.

Johnson recalls all the great years of exhibiting and painting in the Lowell area.

“They’re all realistic paintings,” said Johnson about her work.

Some of them go as far back as to the heydays of another icon, the Lowell Showboat on the Flat River in the 1950s.

“I used to sing on it, and then I painted it,” Johnson said during a recent interview at her home.

As we looked at the dark blue watercolor painting of the Showboat with strings of lights floating on the Flat River hanging in the detached studio, one could imagine the lively atmosphere on the deck.

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Iconic Lowell Showboat with windows into the past by Jan Y. Johnson

You could almost hear the voices singing:

“Here comes the Showboat.”

Circus elephants by artist Jan Johnson of Lowell.
Circus elephants by artist Jan Johnson of Lowell.

Johnson sold two paintings of the Showboat and bought one back when the owner stated, that the painting should stay in the Lowell area.

Johnson has lived in the Lowell area for 57 years.

Growing up on a farm in Alto, Johnson acquired a natural affinity to all animals.

Johnson studied animal drawing at the Ringling College of Art & Design in Sarasota, FL and graduated in 1951.

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Miller Circus at Lowell Fairgrounds, 2016

Prior to that, she studied at the Kendall College of Art & Design in Grand Rapids, and worked as a publication designer for Amway in the 70s.

“It was a wonderful place to work,” she said.

Among her favorites are vivid paintings of exotic animals in circus settings.

Work in progress by Jan Johnson.
“A friend’s boat,” work in progress by Jan Johnson.

Johnson’s most recent watercolor painting is of the Miller Circus which performed in Lowell last August after the fair. She will hang the painting of the circus at the gallery for the new February show.

According to Johnson, the circus ringmaster at the Miller Circus was connected to  the Ringlings.

Johnson spent most of 2016 illustrating the children’s book  “Gertie Goose.”

“It’s a story about bullying,” said Johnson.

Pat Markle, former teacher of Hastings Schools, wrote the book. This was the third project for the author illustrator duo during the last decade.

The book is available at the Lowell Arts and at the Flat River galleries for $15.

“Gertie Goose” was published by J-Ad Graphics of Hastings in 2016.

“They do a good job,” said Johnson.

For more info on publishing go to www.http://www.j-adgraphics.com/

It is also available on Jan’s Facebook page at

https://www.facebook.com/janet.johnson.96742277

Johnson’s art will be at the ArtPrize 2017 from Sept. 20 through Oct. 8.

ArtPrize: https://www.artprize.org/jan-y-johnson

For more info on the Flat River Gallery go to: http://www.flatrivergalleryandframing.com

info@flatrivergalleryandframing.com

Copyright (c) 2017 Emma Blogs, LLC. All rights reserved. No part of this story or its photos may be reproduced without the written consent of author Emma Palova. @EmmaPalova

Sea in Me Unravelled

Christmas time unravels epiphany

By Emma Palova

EW Emma’s Writings

Lowell, MI-This morning, I was fortunate enough to come across the “saidsimply” blog about artistic ventures. And the labyrinth-like colorful painting inspired me to write this epiphany piece.

 

I looked at the photo of the “Sea in Me” painting and the following took place in my head:

This is how I feel about writing when I don’t write for a while; I am lost in a labyrinth of thoughts.

Yesterday, my friend Kitty from the Netherlands really encouraged me. We ran into each other  in the snack aisle at the Lowell Meijer store.
I needed to get some yellow lemonade, ribbons and nuts for undisclosed reasons.
We chatted about Christmas and getting old. We both agreed that Christmas is more about getting together with friends and family than about gifts.
“But, we can do that anytime right?” I asked for assurance all frazzled at this time of the year.
“Sure, that’s what it’s all about, we don’t need Christmas for that,” she laughed.
Kitty has re-posted the Christmas bucket list on Facebook with comment:

“My kind of Christmas.”

Here is the Christmas bucket list

1-Be present instead of buy presents
2-Wrap someone in a hug vs. wrap gifts
3-Send love vs. send gifts
4-Donate food vs. shop for food
5-Make memories vs. make cookies
6-Be the light vs. see the lights

“I am already tired of people asking if the shopping is done and if we are ready for Christmas. Flying the coop again,” Kitty commented.

Kitty told me she was leaving for the holidays for a cruise somewhere in the Caribbean. I was jealous.
“Keep writing, Emma,” she smiled and off she walked with her shopping cart that wasn’t fully loaded with goodies.
And I left the store with warmth in my heart, two yellow Fanta lemonades, hecho en Mexico, a yellow ribbon and some trail mix nuts.I was determined to keep on writing.
Thank you, Kitty and  the saidsimply blog for all of the above.
Emma

For the  simply said blog go to: https://saidsimply.wordpress.com

About the featured tiled photo mosaic:The big photo on the right accompanies post “Secrets, we all have them.”

Small photos on the left from top to bottom:

1-Me at Sea…at the Gulf of Mexico

2-“Glass Flowers” (c) Emma Palova, a manuscript with hand blown pink glass flower from the castel Karlstein in Czech Republic. This was a gift from my daughter Emma.

3-The Wedding Tree at the Marie Selby Botanical Gardens in Sarasota, FL.

Copyright (c) 2016 Emma Blogs, LLC. All rights reserved.

Simple Thoughts About Life & Stuff

A new acrylic on paper.  It has literally been months since I’ve had the paints and brushes out and I must say it was glorious.  I could not resist the impulse to let my inner painter come out and play!

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A Haiku on “Magic”

Feeling inspired today by the Traveling Nurse’s Haiku on “Magic.”
I might try to write a few of my own Haikus.
I wrote some and illustrated them in the early 2000s and later in 2008. I feel like it’s coming back to me at full force during this busy holiday time.
I actually find reprieve in Haiku writing. Haiku to me is like an island in the midst of the vast ocean of writing.
I need to spend some time on this Haiku island to gain strength to head out back into the ocean of writing.
Sometimes, like most writers and authors, I am intimidated by my upcoming writing. I know the idea has already taken some form in my head, and it is waiting to break out.
Will it be the right time and shape for that idea?
I’ve been carrying all these ideas in me for a long long time.
I’ve also been storing the products of my ideas on the shelves of my book cases for what seems like infinity.
Sometimes, I find old stories all dusty and fading on the yellow paper. Editors demanded hard print copies back then.
As I pick those products back up, I wonder what am I going to do with them this time?
Should I wake them up and bring them to life? Like a sleeping giant or a boring midget?
I have an entire collection “Glass Flowers” (c) Emma Palova that was inspired by an important time in my life.
I am dusting that off and bringing it out into the daylight.
It’s about time for my “Glass Flowers” to be broken into endless pieces.
Copyright (c) 2016 Emma Blogs, LLC. All rights reserved.

That Traveling Nurse

It’s Haiku Fridays, People!

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Looking for fairies
Enchanted woods and magic
Please don’t wake me up!

(In response to The Daily Post’s Weekly Photo Challenge on Magic)

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In nature’s harmony

Hunting season 2015 opens strong, artist inspired by hunting

By Emma Palova

Lowell, MI- Today is the opening day of the firearm hunting season in the Midwest. It will last until the end of November.

It may or may not mean anything to big city folks, but out here in the country it is a big deal.

Some school districts like Portland schools in Ionia County close for the opening day, so kids can go out and hunt with their dads.

Although I am not a hunter, I have so many friends, both female and male, who are hunters that I had to post this to honor their passion.

The first who comes to my mind is my artist hunter friend Linda Kropf Phillips of Lowell. Inspired by nature and hunting, Phillips has created a line of slab wood paintings “Natures Serenity.”

Natures Serenity
Natures Serenity art by Linda Kropf Phillips and Jerry Kropf @fallasburg.

The second hunter is a long-time friend from former Czechoslovakia,  Miroslav Hlavenka.  He now resides in Montreal, Canada. Hlavenka is an awesome chef a la naturelle.

Both are hunting now, as I write this post that could also be called “Living in harmony with nature.”

Annually, the sports hunting industry fuels the economy in many ways from direct hunting permits, & gear to indirect sports hunting tourism.

Hunter Miroslav Hlavenka.
Miroslav Hlavenka with his deer and a dog.

And the experts predict a good hunting season due to unseasonably mild weather.

“The deer had a lot to feed on,” said TV sports commentator.

This morning opened strong with clear skies and 50 degree temperatures. Hundreds of hunters in camouflage headed out into the woods.

As I drove to an appointment through the country, I could see cars parked by public hunting lands.

One opening day, I actually headed out into the Lowell State Game Area and joined a local hunter for a great experience, and a great story.

Archery hunting.
Some hunters’ gear.

We always took photos of proud hunters who brought their deer in at the various newspapers that I have worked for.

Phillips of Lowell is already in  Upper Peninsula with four guys determined to get their deer.

We postponed our interview for IW Inspiring Women series until Phillips returns in December.

Phillips fascinates me that she is both an avid hunter and a very apt nature artist and she shows that off in  “Natures Serenity.”

She was one of the first artists at the Fallasburg Village Bazaar last year.

Hlavenka used to hunt already back in former Czechoslovakia. He picked back up his passion in Quebec, as he heads out into the woods.

Nature' Serenity.
Deer art by the Kropfs.

Back in Czech Republic, hunters and public at large celebrated the hunting season with the annual Hunter’s Ball in the winter months.

The hunters wore their green uniforms and made hunter’s goulash for the occasion. It was either venison, boar and rabbit stew or steaks with potato dumplings and red cabbage.

There is something about hunting that’s inherent to human kind. That’s how we survived in the first place all the earth’s elements, agriculture came later.

Whenever I see deer in my garden feasting on apples or turkeys running in the cornfields, there’s joy in my heart, that peace will prevail.

With the upcoming Thanksgiving next week, there is a lot to be thankful for.

Driving through the woods and the fields on a beautiful sunny November morning, crossing the Thornapple, Grand and Flat rivers, I realized how grateful I am for the surrounding nature, for the harmony, for the fall abundance and the co-existence of it all.

Send me a picture of you and your deer and I will post it on my Emma Blogs, LLC portfolio of sites.

Watch for a recipe for Hunter’s Stew coming up.

Also in the works are stories in the IW Inspiring Women winter series. They have the logo of the orchids.

Copyright © 2016 Emma Blogs, LLC. All rights reserved.

Orderly Chaos

Seems like an oxymoron? It isn’t. Just remember Dali, VanGogh or Russian painter Chaim Soutine. And I must mention one of my favorite author’s Nobel Prize winning piece of literature “100 Years of Solitude” by Gabriel Garcia Marquez.

This photo is in response to the Daily Post
Chaos  prompt “Chaos.”

Dressing up for
“Dress rehearsal” for “Chaos” in me.

I was inspired by Soutine’s chaotic paintings of a wild game catch and his twisted villages.

I threw my three summer dresses haphazardly on the bathroom floor along with the yellow ballerina flats that walked 10 kilometers through Paris to the Musee de l’Orangerie in the Tullerie Gardens near the Place de la Concorde.

Inside the gallery, I was flabbergasted by Soutine’s twisted chaotic paintings. The orderly chaos stayed in me.

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Chaim Soutine’s “View of Ceret”

The little girl Ella in the featured photo is confused in the little garden by the house not recognizing any of the plants or berries in the plot.

The left photograph shows the chaos in my EW studio, where I can find everything in its place. Next to the studio is the chaos in the nearby woods with broken tree limbs and trunks rolling in the bed of leaves.

How about the chaos in the upcoming election on Nov. 8th? There are so many different forms of chaos in the world, in nature and in the society.

Take a bite at this “Chaos” assignment. You can’t go wrong with this one. I thoroughly enjoyed how different bloggers treated this encompassing subject.

Copyright (c) 2016 Emma Blogs, LLC. All rights reserved.

In Provence Aug. 26- Aug. 29

International “ladies squad” explores L’art de Vivre in Provence

Note: My summer writer’s retreat 2016 in France takes me from Burgundy south to the heart of Provence for magical four days. Our international “ladies squad” explored three of the seven most beautiful villages in France: Lacoste, Lourmarin, Ansouis and the town of St.Remy-de-Provence. For one year, Van Gogh made his home in St. Remy inspired by the Alpilles.

By Emma Palova

EW Emma’s Writings

Provence, FR- Provençal bastide no.23 sits on Chemin de la Font du Pin between the villages of Cheval-Blanc and Merindol. The mansion with seven bedrooms nestles at the foot of a beach pine forest.

Provencal mas or mansion.
Provencal bastide near Cheval-Blanc.

Typical architecture for this southernmost region of France embraces traditional elements of stone washed walls with tall French doors, large gathering places on the main level and sleeping quarters on the second level. Arches instead of doors open the space between different rooms.

The yard with the garden caters to relaxation and function with  a cafe-style  gazebo lit by sun energy lamps, a large dining table and an iron wrought bed. White Mandeville plants and Hydrangea decorated the gazebo.

The large pool with a colorful cabin is near the house on a cleared terrain in the  white pine beach forest with rosemary shrubs.

Our international “ladies squad” found their bedrooms each equipped with a bathroom and a view into the morning sun bathed beach forest. Tiles are a must in the hot dry climate of Provence.

I shared room no.7 dipped in hues of purple and decorated with butterflies with granddaughter Ella. After a recent conflict, I find solace in the peaceful Provençal atmosphere of farm markets, wine caves, cafes, cobblestone streets, olive groves and deserted châteaux lit by magnificent sunsets.

Interior of a French Provencal bastid.
Inside the bastid. A large living and dining room with French doors into the garden.

The first night we picked ripe grapes in the front yard. Vendange or wine harvest has already started in this part of France. There was also a lime tree and plentiful rosemary shrubs that grew both at the base of the beach forest and in it. To my surprise, on my “balades” through the forest, I also found shrubs of holly.

One morning In the middle of my walk, I stopped dead when I heard a rattling sound.

“A rattlesnake,” I thought and hurried back to the bastide.

Two days later by the pool, Claude pointed out the rattling sound.

“C’est une tone de Cigale de olive,” she said. “That’s the sound of the cigales.”

I laughed at my paranoia originating in my early childhood years while living in Texas.

Mornings, before the heat of the day breaks, are fresh. You wake up to the roosters’ crowing and to the sound of the Cigale in the olive groves and in the rosemary bushes.

Provence landscape.
Beach white pines near the Provençal bastide.

Instead of a Provençal breakfast of hard-boiled eggs with figs, we ate Lyon festive brioche with pralines, compliments of Mrs. Claude Chavent, Emma’s mother-in-law.

Each lady from the squad contributed her own tastes and flavors to the full gourmet experience. The traveling squad consisted of Captain Dr. Emma Palova of Fixin, Chef Selene Alvarez of Veracruz, Mexico, former anesthesiologist Mrs. Claude Chavent of Lyon, FR and journalist, writer Emma Palova of USA. Both Emmas were born in former Czechoslovakia.

On a late Saturday morning, daughter Emma and I headed out to the Merindol market.

Instead of a marche extravaganza,  we only found an olive and cheese merchant  along with a straw hat and a bag vendor.

“It’s the summer break,” said the olive vendor.

Marche in Provence
Olive merchant in Merindol, Provence.

“It’s all about the love for life here in France, not about money,” Emma educated me. “It’s called l’art de vivre.”

 

For our apero that night, Emma bought an olive spread “olivenade”, a dried tomato spread, cheese, spicy olives with pimento and olives in brine with Provençal herbs at the market in Merindol.

Wine tasting in Provence near Merindol.
Wine tasting stands at the markets in Provence.

Walking a narrow street up the hill, we stopped at a local hangout spot for coffee and tea on the sidewalk. I love watching people in these quaint villages not occupied by tourists. The locals were already drinking wine and beer.

A woman wearing an apron dress with a large grocery bag hurried past the abandoned tobacco shop. A chic woman overdressed in a black T-shirt with long sleeves pedaled uphill, while a youngster on a bike with fresh bread in his backpack closely followed her.

I wasn’t alone watching the action. A Provençal old-time villager was sitting in his chair right in front of his house on the street. Of course the woman haltered her hurry to exchange gossip with the old-timer. There’s always time for gossip in these villages.

Provence cafes and brasseries.
Cafe in Merindol, Provence.

We also came across a reformed church, an anomaly in  the mainly catholic France.

We stopped at a farm market on our way back to the bastide to get fresh strawberries and mangoes for the planned Daiquiri drinks by the pool.

We tasted wine from a local wine caterer stationed right by the market stand.

Even though pink wine known as rose is the wine of choice in the Provence region, I bought a bottle of white wine for the apero. Nothing like Burgundy whites, but it tasted better than the rose.

 

To be continued…………………The most beautiful villages of France

 

Copyright © 2016 Emma Blogs, LLC. All rights reserved.

Hoola dream

“Hoola” your dream for having  a home based business

By Emma Palova

EW Emma’s Writings

Lowell, MI- Inspired by another woman at the Grand Rapids Women’s Expo last year, Sue Majinska started her home based business with Hoola jewelry seven months ago.

“I love the idea of having unique jewelry that nobody else has,” said Majinska. “And being able to get it at a reasonable price.”

Well, who doesn’t?

Hoola jewelry
Sue Majinska surrounded by Hoola jewelry.

The Hoola interchangeable jewelry comes in individual kits with different pieces. From these kits, you design your own jewelry using a simple process. You start with a hoop, add a hoola, a second hoola and a third hoola or more if you wish. You get a beautiful piece of jewelry that looks a lot more expensive than it is.

The ever-changing jewelry sizzles and shines in daylight or night.

During the interview, Majinska showed two different kits and demonstrated the process how to put the jewelry together. The Silver Shine kit is for $49.99 and the Spring Bling Earring special kit is for $29.99. Each kit has a higher value. The shine kit is valued at $130 and the spring bling has a value of $70.

Hoola Jewelry is a new merchant this year in the GNO event.
Hoola Jewelry is a new merchant this year in the GNO event.

“It’s a new concept to West Michigan,” said Majinska.

The Hoola business women are home based jewelry consultants or reps. They come into other houses for Hoola parties for 10 to 15 women.

Although one on one consulting is also available, the preferred way are the jewelry design parties with boxed starter sets.

“You just take a basic hoop and add anything you want to it,” said Majinska. “You get out of one kit over a 100 looks.”

Majinska, who is on the phone a lot, likes the jewelry because of its light weight.

The basic material is fine sterling silver with 7.5 percent alloy to prevent breaking. Sterling silver will eventually tarnish, not by defect, but as a result of exposure to chemicals, cosmetics, hairspray perspiration, direct sunlight, or humidity.

Other interesting materials used to make different jewelry designs are Mother-of-Pearl (M.O.P.) This is a shell with a natural layer of nacre, making it a close “relative” to the pearl. It has a similar luster to pearl and it works well in designing combinations together.

Sue Majinska put on a Hoola demo at the Lowell Expo last month.
Sue Majinska put on a Hoola demo at the Lowell Expo last month.

The Spring Bling Earrings kit uses the mother-of-pearl hoolas for a colorful fresh look.

The company is a mother/daughter team, Laurel & Lauren Gravelyn based in Chelsey, Michigan.

For Hoola jewelry designers like Majinska, every day is like Christmas.

“How can you not go with that,” she said. “It’s no longer what am I going to do today?”

Most women like putting the jewelry together themselves. As a banker, Majinska deals with math every day.

“This is my creative side,” she said. “It allows me to be creative. I love being around people and socializing. Having a home-based business fits my personality.”

The other fun aspect of the Hoola business is that it moves with you.

“If we want to move, I can take it with me,” Majinska said.

Majinska carries all her Hoola jewelry in one compact bag.

And the company plans to grow all over 50 states. They have reps now in California and Florida.

“I think they would go international,” she said.

The Hoola business is allowing women to be independent and enjoy having options for jewelry that no one else has.

“You have a unique look,” Majinska said.

For Hoola parties, Majinska suggests having at least 10 to 15 people. She puts on a 15-minute demo, and then the hostess and the guests get to design their own interchangeable jewelry. The hostess earns her jewelry for putting on the party.

Majinska did well at last month’s Expo in Lowell.

“It was a great way to introduce the jewelry line to the local area,” she said. “It was time and money well spent. It was nice to see everybody in the community.

Majinska is taking the Hoola jewelry to Girls Night Out on April 16. She will be next to Advance Eye Care storefront along with Pauly’s.

For more information contact Majinska at 1-616-334-6744 or go to her Sue’s Hoola Jewelry facebook page.

ArtPrize 2014

ArtPrize 2014 brings inspiration to Grand Rapids

By Sarah Harmon

EW Emma’s Writings

EW writer Sarah Harmon hosts exchange students
EW writer Sarah Harmon hosts exchange students

What is art? Whether your preference is for painting, sculpture, photography, or performance, there is no better place in the world to answer that question than Grand Rapids during ArtPrize. For almost three weeks every fall, all of downtown transforms into the world’s biggest, and possibly most eclectic, art museum, and the best part is that seeing the art is completely free. In an age where budget cuts have forced schools to eliminate fine arts programs, it is incredible to watch hundreds of students be exposed to others’ artistic expressions and become inspired to create their own. ArtPrize Education Days offer free workshops where kids meet artists and explore their creative sides. This year, Top 20 artist, Kevin Sudeith, helped them to make prints using paint and paper applied directly to his “Grand River Fish Petroglyph” for one of the classes. He also explained that all of his installations are meant to be permanent, so his creation will be displayed near the river long after the competition ends.

Grand River Petroglyph by Kevin Sudeth
Grand River Petroglyph by Kevin Sudeth

 

“Reciprocity,” a 3D finalist featured in the Grand Rapids Art Museum, is a sculpture so lifelike, down to the wrinkles and veins in the men’s skin, that you expect them to move at any moment. On the other hand, Time Based finalist Robert Shangle performs as a living sculpture that upon first glance you would never guess wasn’t made of clay. He compared the stamina required for a day as a sculpture to running a marathon. Shangle was looking forward to cutting back on his performance hours when he was pleasantly surprised with being in the top 5.

Reciprocity
Reciprocity

 

We tend to forget that much of art has a far deeper purpose than just to be beautiful. It’s there to make us look inside ourselves, to see our own desires and passions reflected through someone else’s mirror, and sometimes to inspire us to create change. “Weave Peace,” outside the Public Museum, asks you to write a hope or a peaceful intention and tie it to the dome to join thousands of others. In stark contrast, “The Scarlet Cord,” near the Gerald R Ford Museum, discusses the horrors of sex trafficking. A related Scarlet Cord piece outside Propaganda Doughnuts encourages you to write a prayer on red ribbon and to exchange it for someone else’s prayer that touches your heart.

 

With its wide variety of mediums and subject matter, ArtPrize reminds us that anything, from the mundane to the fantastical, can become something beautiful and unique under the guidance of the right artist. Given the opportunity, the right piece of art can even change the world.

Copyright (c) All rights reserved Emma Blogs LLC